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Counterpoint: Let the band mix it up!

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I love For Boston too, but absence can make the heart grow fonder

NCAA Football: Wagner at Boston College Bob DeChiara-USA TODAY Sports

Much like CoachJF, who laid out his case for hearing For Boston more yesterday, I, too, love listening to college bands. And also like CoachJF, I love our fight song, and think it’s one of the best in the nation.

Unlike Coach, I don’t think it needs to be played 30 times a game. Why not let the band mix it up?

I can’t watch a Michigan, Notre Dame or (ugh, don’t even get me started) Oklahoma game without thinking “tone it down with the fight song already.” They all have great songs, but sometimes absence makes the heart grow fonder.

Even at hockey games, Michigan and Notre Dame seem to play their fight songs incessantly.

I’m kind of too old at this point to say I’m offering the “young person’s” perspective, but I’ll do my best: I think it’s actually pretty cool to hear the band’s take on pop songs. Sometimes, even songs I hate become fun and enjoyable depending on the band’s arrangement.

Sometimes it’s a swing and a miss (See: the introduction of “Ole” by the Bouncing Souls this year). Sometimes it’s an unexpected smash hit (see: the reaction of the crowd when the band plays Macklemore’s “Can’t Hold Us”). Either way, it’s fun to hear the variety.

In addition to various pop songs and classics, I’m also a big fan of occasionally sprinkling in BC’s other fight songs, which seems to be happening more than it used to. “Sweep Down The Field” has been resurrected from its spot as just being a part of the pregame show and now is even occasionally played at hockey games (despite the lack of a field, it still works).

“Sons of Maroon and Gold” makes an appearance in the pregame show, but maybe that can also be liberated and added to the regular repertoire?

Don’t get me wrong, I love “For Boston.” But let’s save it for the team entrance and for touchdowns (and let’s score some more touchdowns). When the band needs to lift up the crowd, why not get us used to one of the other school songs?

Now that the terms of this extremely serious and important debate have been dictated, what do you think?